Sunday, May 18, 2008

James F. Crow on the Paternal Age Effect in 1994

I don't find this nonlinear effect at all surprising. Everything gets worse with age, so I fully expect fidelity of replication, efficiency of editing, and error correction to deteriorate with age. For a man of age 20, the male mutation rate is about 8 times the female rate. With a linear increase, in a man at age 30, the ratio is 430/24 = 18, at age 45 it is 770/24 = 32. With nonlinearity, these ratios are much larger, some 30-fold at age 30 and as much as two orders of magnitude at age 40. Examples such as MEN2A, MEN2B, and Apert syndrome, in which a total of 92 new mutations were all paternal, are therefore not so surprising. Whatever selective forces reduced the mutation rate in our distant past, at a time when most reproduction must have been very early, were not effective for older males.

I conclude that for a number of diseases the mutation rate increases with age and at a rate much faster than linear. This suggests that the greatest mutational health hazard in the human population at present is fertile old males



Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

<< Home